Author Archive: Contributing Writer

rss feed YouTube

Cooperative But Not Conforming

| November 27, 2012 | 0 Comments
Cooperative But Not Conforming

China established its foreign aid programs soon after the founding of the People’s Republic of China in 1949, when the country itself was short of funds. Today, China has come to the forefront as a development partner, especially in Africa. China has historically been unique as an aid-giving country. China’s presence in Africa, for example, started in 1956—around the time Bretton Woods Institutions were established with a focus on Europe. When aid from “traditional donors” stagnated in the late 2000s because of the global economic crisis, China continued increasing investment in Africa, drawing the world’s attention with the Forum on China-Africa Cooperation, established in 2000.

Continue Reading

Infectious Entertainment

| November 26, 2012 | 0 Comments
Infectious Entertainment

“This just doesn’t feel right,” I reflected, while the bacteria I created spread from one continent to another, coloring the world map a menacing red. Maniacal enthusiasm in using my “DNA points” to upgrade my bacteria’s infectiousness, ability to transmit, and symptoms all too quickly meant I had no infected people left at the end of the game, rendering this round a total failure. Incidentally, I only made my creation extra-multi-resistant (and had there been a totally resistant option I probably would have vamped up to it in no time). Alas, it’s not every day you pretend to bring about the end of humanity using your own carefully customized pathogen! I would not, however, go as far as stating that “Killing billions has never been so fun”, as stated in one of the many positive reviews for the iPhone game app “Plague.”

Continue Reading

Who Pays for Health? Global Health Financing Today and Tomorrow

| November 15, 2012 | 0 Comments
Who Pays for Health? Global Health Financing Today and Tomorrow

Baby Janelle, a two-year old living outside Kampala, Uganda, falls sick with cough, vomiting and fever. Her single mother, a day laborer in the stone quarries, is forced to choose between taking Janelle to the health center – for which she must pay herself – and paying school fees for her other two children.

Continue Reading

The Forgotten Disease: Implications for the Future of Mental Health Care in Ghana and the U.S.

| October 19, 2012 | 1 Comment
The Forgotten Disease: Implications for the Future of Mental Health Care in Ghana and the U.S.

As reported by the Ghanaian NGO Basic Needs, a man by the identity of M. has been suffering through his mental illness and wandering about Ghana’s countryside for nearly 20 years, eventually getting his leg stuck in a fallen tree trunk. M. has remained in that same position for four years, plagued by his disease and nearly forgotten by the rest of society.

Continue Reading

Funding Orphan Drugs: Pitfalls of the Orphan Drug Act

| October 19, 2012 | 0 Comments
Funding Orphan Drugs: Pitfalls of the Orphan Drug Act

The debate over cost and access to drugs has long raged between patients, health advocates, and pharmaceutical companies. For patients with “orphan diseases,” or rare diseases which affect fewer than 200,000 people in the United States, this debate becomes particularly acute, as the Orphan Drug Act passed by Congress in 1983 threatens to drive up prices for highly specialized treatments. While the Orphan Drug Act has helped to bring drugs for rare diseases to millions of patients and continues to stimulate research and development of orphan drugs, the law is certainly not without its problems and caveats.

Continue Reading

The World Will Never Know: An Anthropological View of Humanitarian Aid in Response to the Pakistan Floods

| October 19, 2012 | 0 Comments
The World Will Never Know: An Anthropological View of Humanitarian Aid in Response to the Pakistan Floods

In August 2010, the worst floods in recent history struck Pakistan, precipitating a humanitarian crisis and widespread destruction of health infrastructure and loss of access to clean water. The consequences for the health of the internally displaced person (IDP) are considerable given the three main epidemics facing the displaced population: cholera, malaria, and dengue fever. The humanitarian challenge presented by this unholy trinity of flood-precipitated diseases is both immediate and severe. This analysis considers the possible underlying causes of the limited humanitarian response and its implications for future humanitarian efforts, with a focus on how knowledge-flows could effectively improve the aid response.

Continue Reading

Explaining the Health Effects of Women’s Schooling in the Developing World

| May 15, 2012 | 0 Comments
Explaining the Health Effects of Women’s Schooling in the Developing World

Global health research has long faced a paradox: That the school attainment of mothers is associated – strongly, independently and in most less-developed countries – with reduced child mortality and other beneficial health outcomes, but no consensus has emerged about why or how this happens. A new book from our Project on Maternal Schooling at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, Literacy and Mothering, tackles this problem directly, not only with a detailed theoretical explanation but also with evidence from literacy assessments of mothers in four countries: Mexico, Nepal, Venezuela and Zambia.

Continue Reading

From the Floodwaters Flow The Impact of Water in Bangladesh

| February 1, 2012 | 0 Comments
From the Floodwaters Flow The Impact of Water in Bangladesh

By Michelle Lee Situated at the confluence of the Ganges, the Brahmaputra, and the Meghna Rivers, Bangladesh has a tumultuous relationship with water, a problem present in both excess and scarcity. Though the country has many water sources and receives abundant rainfall, clean water is limited and often polluted. Flooding during the monsoon season leaves […]

Continue Reading

Neglected: Raising Funds for the “Best Buy” in Global Public Health

| February 1, 2012 | 0 Comments
Neglected: Raising Funds for the “Best Buy” in Global Public Health

By Sheba Mathew Neglected disease campaigns, like any other, demand money, but they do it to save lives. $25 to save a life with an HIV test. $20 to save a life with six months of tuberculosis medications. $10 to save a family with a malaria net. What about fifty cents a year to save […]

Continue Reading

Integration of Health Services: Theory and Practices

| February 1, 2012 | 0 Comments
Integration of Health Services: Theory and Practices

In Seattle we often are fortunate enough to have access to a good health clinic or physician, where we can go for regular check-ups and screening tests, get necessary immunizations, address our reproductive health needs, get assessed and treated for many illnesses or injuries, and obtain referrals when we need care that the clinic does not provide. This kind of accessible, integrated care, with its focus on prevention, standard treatment for common health problems, and monitoring of chronic conditions is good for individuals, families, and communities. Yet many people around the world face a much different health care picture.

Continue Reading