RSSCategory: Policy

Sasha and Malia Versus the FDA

| February 29, 2012 | 0 Comments
Sasha and Malia Versus the FDA

Access to reproductive healthcare is an inflammatory subject matter, often discussed in ideological rather than medical terms. Its attachment to sexuality and social norms distracts the public, legislators, and the judiciary from the de facto result of confounding morality with medicine. In other words, notions of virtue are relevant to families, not the state, and replacing evidence-based policy with dogma leaves women without care, regardless of the circumstances that placed them in need.

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Restructuring Urban Healthcare: Beyond the Cultural Model for Immigrants’ Healthcare Disparities

| February 1, 2012 | 0 Comments
Restructuring Urban Healthcare:  Beyond the Cultural Model for Immigrants’ Healthcare Disparities

By Sarah McCuskee Immigrant populations, including the Boston Haitian community, face staggering disparities in health. Structural issues are largely at fault—but more ambiguous “cultural” factors are often blamed as well. These factors—things like language and “health beliefs”—may be important: in 1970, Philip Tumulty wrote “what the scalpel is to the surgeon, words are to the […]

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Global Health in Japan: A Moral and Economic Dilemma

| February 1, 2012 | 0 Comments
Global Health in Japan:  A Moral and Economic Dilemma

After the Great East Japan Earthquake disrupted the lives of thousands of Japanese citizens in March 2011, it was expected that Japan’s foreign assistance would be significantly diminished in favor of domestic aid. Yet, Japan has continued to be involved in global health despite the tragedy. Japan’s commitment to global health illuminates how global health […]

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Neglected: Raising Funds for the “Best Buy” in Global Public Health

| February 1, 2012 | 0 Comments
Neglected: Raising Funds for the “Best Buy” in Global Public Health

By Sheba Mathew Neglected disease campaigns, like any other, demand money, but they do it to save lives. $25 to save a life with an HIV test. $20 to save a life with six months of tuberculosis medications. $10 to save a family with a malaria net. What about fifty cents a year to save […]

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Integration of Health Services: Theory and Practices

| February 1, 2012 | 0 Comments
Integration of Health Services: Theory and Practices

In Seattle we often are fortunate enough to have access to a good health clinic or physician, where we can go for regular check-ups and screening tests, get necessary immunizations, address our reproductive health needs, get assessed and treated for many illnesses or injuries, and obtain referrals when we need care that the clinic does not provide. This kind of accessible, integrated care, with its focus on prevention, standard treatment for common health problems, and monitoring of chronic conditions is good for individuals, families, and communities. Yet many people around the world face a much different health care picture.

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Electronic Health Systems: Good for Health, Sanity, and the Environment Too

| November 19, 2011 | 0 Comments
Electronic Health Systems: Good for Health, Sanity, and the Environment Too

Shaira Bhanji Global Health Finance Columnist Paper records, the optimal means by which to capitalize on human error, characterize most current medical information systems. The results are incorrectly prescribed drugs, service delays, and lost files, which together eat about 30-50 percent of U.S. healthcare spending—a hefty $1 trillion per year.[1] Unbeknownst to many, medical errors […]

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Family Planning: An Effective Approach to Cost Containment

| November 17, 2011 | 0 Comments
Family Planning: An Effective Approach to Cost Containment

Vishal Arora Health Policy Columnist This past week, there were mixed reactions regarding recent data from the United Nations numbering the world population at 7 billion.[1]  Some might welcome this announcement as evidence of advancing healthcare technologies and the provision of essential medicines worldwide.  On the other hand, this sharp increase in population size sheds […]

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Bullying the Boss? Compulsory Licensing for Antiretroviral Drugs in Brazil and Thailand

| October 21, 2011 | 0 Comments
Bullying the Boss? Compulsory Licensing for Antiretroviral Drugs in Brazil and Thailand

By Shaira Bhanji Global Health Finance Columnist Underdeveloped, HIV-burdened regions of the world have the potential to make strides toward better survival outcomes, but they lack key resources. Simple antiretroviral drugs such as Efavirenz and Kaletra have been shown to lower deaths from HIV/AIDS by as much as 84 percent, yet the prices of these […]

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Prescription for Failure: The Need for Addressing Corruption in India

| October 19, 2011 | 0 Comments
Prescription for Failure: The Need for Addressing Corruption in India

By Vishal Arora Health Policy Columnist This past September, the New York Times ran a story about three Indian health officials being shot to death within a span of one year.  All three of them were involved in transactions dealing with the healthcare budget of Uttar Pradesh, a state within India.[1] Speculations about the killings center […]

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