RSSCategory: Spring 2012

The Forgotten Disease: Implications for the Future of Mental Health Care in Ghana and the U.S.

| October 19, 2012 | 1 Comment
The Forgotten Disease: Implications for the Future of Mental Health Care in Ghana and the U.S.

As reported by the Ghanaian NGO Basic Needs, a man by the identity of M. has been suffering through his mental illness and wandering about Ghana’s countryside for nearly 20 years, eventually getting his leg stuck in a fallen tree trunk. M. has remained in that same position for four years, plagued by his disease and nearly forgotten by the rest of society.

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Funding Orphan Drugs: Pitfalls of the Orphan Drug Act

| October 19, 2012 | 0 Comments
Funding Orphan Drugs: Pitfalls of the Orphan Drug Act

The debate over cost and access to drugs has long raged between patients, health advocates, and pharmaceutical companies. For patients with “orphan diseases,” or rare diseases which affect fewer than 200,000 people in the United States, this debate becomes particularly acute, as the Orphan Drug Act passed by Congress in 1983 threatens to drive up prices for highly specialized treatments. While the Orphan Drug Act has helped to bring drugs for rare diseases to millions of patients and continues to stimulate research and development of orphan drugs, the law is certainly not without its problems and caveats.

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The World Will Never Know: An Anthropological View of Humanitarian Aid in Response to the Pakistan Floods

| October 19, 2012 | 0 Comments
The World Will Never Know: An Anthropological View of Humanitarian Aid in Response to the Pakistan Floods

In August 2010, the worst floods in recent history struck Pakistan, precipitating a humanitarian crisis and widespread destruction of health infrastructure and loss of access to clean water. The consequences for the health of the internally displaced person (IDP) are considerable given the three main epidemics facing the displaced population: cholera, malaria, and dengue fever. The humanitarian challenge presented by this unholy trinity of flood-precipitated diseases is both immediate and severe. This analysis considers the possible underlying causes of the limited humanitarian response and its implications for future humanitarian efforts, with a focus on how knowledge-flows could effectively improve the aid response.

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