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DMK Internship Story

| August 20, 2014 | 0 Comments
DMK Internship Story

By Nathan Georgette

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The burden of aid: how do we improve aid effectiveness to improve health outcomes?

| August 20, 2014 | 0 Comments
The burden of aid: how do we improve aid effectiveness to improve health outcomes?

By Aparna Kamath Master of Science Candidate, Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard School of Public Health

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Gamification Rules

| August 20, 2014 | 0 Comments
Gamification Rules

By Annie Ryu Annie Ryu is Co-founder and CSO of LifeGuard Games, a company building edugame apps to teach and motivate kids to manage chronic conditions. Prior to launching LifeGuard Games, she co-founded, directed, and implemented a maternal and child health SMS-based venture in rural southern India.

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Medicines360 and the Rise of Non-Profit Pharmaceuticals

| January 15, 2013 | 0 Comments
Medicines360 and the Rise of Non-Profit Pharmaceuticals

Reproductive health is becoming an increasingly important concern in developing countries, where it represents the confluence of three essential issues: women’s rights, health, and economics. Increasing the availability of contraceptives can address all three of these issues, yet pharmaceutical companies are often reluctant to pursue these projects because the available profit margin is small. But effective solutions to this and other global health problems need not be reliant on large pharmaceutical companies.

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Public-Private Partnerships: A Double-Edged Sword

| November 16, 2012 | 0 Comments
Public-Private Partnerships: A Double-Edged Sword

The varied financial models for funding global health have caused uncertainty regarding the ideal structure of global health organizations. With a number of interests at stake – including those of governments, profit-driven initiatives, and philanthropic organizations – there are often conflicts between groups whose goals do not align.

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Who Pays for Health? Global Health Financing Today and Tomorrow

| November 15, 2012 | 0 Comments
Who Pays for Health? Global Health Financing Today and Tomorrow

Baby Janelle, a two-year old living outside Kampala, Uganda, falls sick with cough, vomiting and fever. Her single mother, a day laborer in the stone quarries, is forced to choose between taking Janelle to the health center – for which she must pay herself – and paying school fees for her other two children.

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The Forgotten Disease: Implications for the Future of Mental Health Care in Ghana and the U.S.

| October 19, 2012 | 1 Comment
The Forgotten Disease: Implications for the Future of Mental Health Care in Ghana and the U.S.

As reported by the Ghanaian NGO Basic Needs, a man by the identity of M. has been suffering through his mental illness and wandering about Ghana’s countryside for nearly 20 years, eventually getting his leg stuck in a fallen tree trunk. M. has remained in that same position for four years, plagued by his disease and nearly forgotten by the rest of society.

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Funding Orphan Drugs: Pitfalls of the Orphan Drug Act

| October 19, 2012 | 0 Comments
Funding Orphan Drugs: Pitfalls of the Orphan Drug Act

The debate over cost and access to drugs has long raged between patients, health advocates, and pharmaceutical companies. For patients with “orphan diseases,” or rare diseases which affect fewer than 200,000 people in the United States, this debate becomes particularly acute, as the Orphan Drug Act passed by Congress in 1983 threatens to drive up prices for highly specialized treatments. While the Orphan Drug Act has helped to bring drugs for rare diseases to millions of patients and continues to stimulate research and development of orphan drugs, the law is certainly not without its problems and caveats.

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The World Will Never Know: An Anthropological View of Humanitarian Aid in Response to the Pakistan Floods

| October 19, 2012 | 0 Comments
The World Will Never Know: An Anthropological View of Humanitarian Aid in Response to the Pakistan Floods

In August 2010, the worst floods in recent history struck Pakistan, precipitating a humanitarian crisis and widespread destruction of health infrastructure and loss of access to clean water. The consequences for the health of the internally displaced person (IDP) are considerable given the three main epidemics facing the displaced population: cholera, malaria, and dengue fever. The humanitarian challenge presented by this unholy trinity of flood-precipitated diseases is both immediate and severe. This analysis considers the possible underlying causes of the limited humanitarian response and its implications for future humanitarian efforts, with a focus on how knowledge-flows could effectively improve the aid response.

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Explaining the Health Effects of Women’s Schooling in the Developing World

| May 15, 2012 | 0 Comments
Explaining the Health Effects of Women’s Schooling in the Developing World

Global health research has long faced a paradox: That the school attainment of mothers is associated – strongly, independently and in most less-developed countries – with reduced child mortality and other beneficial health outcomes, but no consensus has emerged about why or how this happens. A new book from our Project on Maternal Schooling at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, Literacy and Mothering, tackles this problem directly, not only with a detailed theoretical explanation but also with evidence from literacy assessments of mothers in four countries: Mexico, Nepal, Venezuela and Zambia.

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