Tag: Economics

Health Consequences for Mothers and Children: The Feminzation of Migration in West Africa

| November 30, 2012 | 0 Comments
Health Consequences for Mothers and Children: The Feminzation of Migration in West Africa

In the summer of 2010, while interning at a migration health policy organization in Dakar, Senegal, I was speaking with my manager about the benefits and challenges of living in Senegal versus the United States. An educated and well-traveled Senegalese woman expressed that it was much easier to live in Africa than in the United States because domestic help was readily available and inexpensive. In addition to the comforts of familiarity in her home country, the availability of cheap domestic help was a main reason that she and her family planned to remain in Dakar…

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Funding the Millennium Development Goals: Exploring Innovative Finance Amidst the Recession

| April 14, 2012 | 0 Comments
Funding the Millennium Development Goals: Exploring Innovative Finance Amidst the Recession

The bursting of the U.S. housing bubble in 2007 sent the global economy into a decline, eliciting budget cuts in public spending and significant decreases in voluntary contributions, particularly in the field of health. Although spending to improve health in the developing world has increased throughout the recession, the growth rate for this spending has leveled off. As countries like the United States reduce their health aid overseas, other organizations and must work harder to fight the economic effects of the financial crisis.

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Price Discrimination in Pharmaceutical Companies: The Method to the “Madness”

| April 2, 2012 | 1 Comment
Price Discrimination in Pharmaceutical Companies: The Method to the “Madness”

Pharmaceutical companies, or what critics call “big pharma,” are often condemned for charging prices above marginal cost and price discriminating between different countries (calculating each country’s ability to pay). These practices lie at the heart of feuds such as compulsory licensing, a strategy employed by countries to obtain generic drugs. However, the economics of price discrimination demands a closer look.

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Integration: An Effective and Efficient Global Health Approach

| April 2, 2012 | 0 Comments
Integration: An Effective and Efficient Global Health Approach

Imagine addressing HIV/AIDS, malaria, and diarrhea in a single intervention.  Policymakers would be pleased at having integrated services in health plans and, more importantly, patients would receive well-rounded health care provisions.  In fact, a recent study in Kenya has done just this, proving to the global health community that this is a better approach to health interventions within a country.

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Availability of Essential Medications for Non-Communicable and Chronic Diseases in Low and Middle Income Countries

| February 1, 2012 | 0 Comments
Availability of Essential Medications for Non-Communicable and Chronic Diseases in Low and Middle Income Countries

Non-communicable and chronic diseases (NCDs) are on the rise throughout the world, but they pose an especially great challenge in low and middle income countries (LMIC). With limited resources for healthcare and prevention, these regions, still affected by a high burden of infectious diseases, are now facing a double epidemic. Many of the chronic diseases such as diabetes, chronic respiratory disease, cardiovascular disease, and cancer, require medications to prevent, treat, and alleviate their painful and persistent symptoms…

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The Only Animal Disease to be Eradicated: A Critical Exploration of Rinderpest and Our Future with Diseases

| October 25, 2011 | 0 Comments
The Only Animal Disease to be Eradicated: A Critical Exploration of Rinderpest and Our Future with Diseases

Disease eradication used to be a somewhat far-fetched idea even after the 1980 eradication of smallpox. It seemed like a one-time nonreplicable incident, simply a historic medical feat. The complicated politics surrounding disease eradication—enforcing water hygiene, reducing stigmatization, establishing a viable healthcare infrastructure system—continue to seem too overwhelming to resolve. Yet, recent events in the […]

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