Tag: WHO

Surgical Disease: The Reality Beyond the Big Screen

| November 25, 2012 | 0 Comments
Surgical Disease: The Reality Beyond the Big Screen

Here in the United States, in a culture where Grey’s Anatomy monopolizes the television screens of American households, it is difficult to envision a place without surgical infrastructure. However, this is the reality of life, and death, in many parts of the world. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), two billion people globally have no access to emergency or surgical care. However, unlike the success of surgical television shows in captivating public interest, the reality of surgical need on a global scale has yet to garner any significant attention. Addressing this unmet disease burden is a feasible undertaking that demands increased attention from the global community.

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Public-Private Partnerships: A Double-Edged Sword

| November 16, 2012 | 0 Comments
Public-Private Partnerships: A Double-Edged Sword

The varied financial models for funding global health have caused uncertainty regarding the ideal structure of global health organizations. With a number of interests at stake – including those of governments, profit-driven initiatives, and philanthropic organizations – there are often conflicts between groups whose goals do not align.

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The Forgotten Disease: Implications for the Future of Mental Health Care in Ghana and the U.S.

| October 19, 2012 | 1 Comment
The Forgotten Disease: Implications for the Future of Mental Health Care in Ghana and the U.S.

As reported by the Ghanaian NGO Basic Needs, a man by the identity of M. has been suffering through his mental illness and wandering about Ghana’s countryside for nearly 20 years, eventually getting his leg stuck in a fallen tree trunk. M. has remained in that same position for four years, plagued by his disease and nearly forgotten by the rest of society.

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Integration: An Effective and Efficient Global Health Approach

| April 2, 2012 | 0 Comments
Integration: An Effective and Efficient Global Health Approach

Imagine addressing HIV/AIDS, malaria, and diarrhea in a single intervention.  Policymakers would be pleased at having integrated services in health plans and, more importantly, patients would receive well-rounded health care provisions.  In fact, a recent study in Kenya has done just this, proving to the global health community that this is a better approach to health interventions within a country.

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Integration of Health Services: Theory and Practices

| February 1, 2012 | 0 Comments
Integration of Health Services: Theory and Practices

In Seattle we often are fortunate enough to have access to a good health clinic or physician, where we can go for regular check-ups and screening tests, get necessary immunizations, address our reproductive health needs, get assessed and treated for many illnesses or injuries, and obtain referrals when we need care that the clinic does not provide. This kind of accessible, integrated care, with its focus on prevention, standard treatment for common health problems, and monitoring of chronic conditions is good for individuals, families, and communities. Yet many people around the world face a much different health care picture.

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An Exercise in Economics: Cervical Cancer Prevention in the Developing World

| November 15, 2011 | 0 Comments
An Exercise in Economics: Cervical Cancer Prevention in the Developing World

Mortality from cervical cancer highlights the striking global disparities in access to healthcare. The second most common cancer among women worldwide, cervical cancer causes 274,000 deaths each year with more than 80% of these deaths occurring in developing countries. Recently, a safe and effective vaccine has been developed for the cancer-causing serotypes of the sexually transmitted human papilloma virus (HPV) – the cause of 70% of cervical cancer.

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Where is Mental Health?

| October 21, 2011 | 0 Comments
Where is Mental Health?

This first segment of a two-part series focuses on the absence of mental health as a significant priority on the global health stage. Unlike the more visible problems of HIV, malnutrition, or maternal and child health, mental health has not attained a heightened sense of urgency on the global health stage. The World Health Organization […]

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Emerging Multi-Drug Resistant Salmonella

| October 20, 2011 | 0 Comments
Emerging Multi-Drug Resistant Salmonella

The threat of salmonella infections has existed for more than a century as they are some of the most widely spread food-borne diseases. For several countries Salmonella has been a significant health burden—infecting millions and killing thousands worldwide. One of the most prevalent strains is Salmonella enterica, which is the cause of major foodborne illness […]

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Transgenic Mosquitoes: A New Approach to Preventing Malaria?

| October 20, 2011 | 0 Comments
Transgenic Mosquitoes: A New Approach to Preventing Malaria?

Malaria is preventable and curable, yet, due to gaps in systematized prevention efforts, the disease accounts for 20% of childhood deaths in Africa. As a result, groups such as the World Health Organization (WHO) have targeted malaria through vertical vector control programs. WHO identifies these efforts as “the only intervention that can reduce malaria transmission from very high levels to close to zero”. However, the success of top-down vector control efforts is limited because by nature they are often focused on one specific issue…

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The UN High-Level Meeting on Non-Communicable Diseases: Raising Awareness But Little Else

| October 19, 2011 | 0 Comments
The UN High-Level Meeting on Non-Communicable Diseases: Raising Awareness But Little Else

This September, representatives of UN member states convened in New York to discuss the prevention and control of non-communicable disease (NCDs) through action and research. This was the second UN General Assembly meeting on a global health topic, but it failed to achieve much beyond raising awareness of one of the most pressing and understated problems of global health this century.

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